Enjoy the Music.com

Letters To Us


 

02/01/04

Dear Steve, 

I recently saw your past Letters to Us page and I was wondering if you have any information on the Sony D-25S CD player. I have been searching about for months to look for this player and I would really appreciate it if you could help me. Could you possibly release the e-mail address of the guy that said " mentioned that a company in California had purchased an odd lot of these Sony D-25s from Sony and that they were brand new. So I ordered one for about $45 (less battery)." in the letter dated 9/1/03? I desperately want to acquire this CD player and if you can help me, I would be extremely appreciative.

Thanks, 

Alex G.

Alex,

As you know the "S" version was for Europe. The gentleman in California sold all units he had long ago. The D25, like the D555, are hard to find so i suggest you keep checking Ebay and other resources.

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Dear Mr. Rochlin,

I have read your well-written review of the Reference de Capo speakers. Thank you. I will be using my speakers with an SET amplifier, either a 2A3 or 300B. Although I cannot help but be interested in the de Capos, are there any horn speakers which you would recommend I look at within the $2,000 to $4,000 range? Also, it sounds that if I went with the de Capos, the 300Bs would do better. Am I correct in this assessment?

Thanks.

Ron

Ron,

A most humble thanks for your compliment on my review of the Reference de Capo loudspeakers. In my opinion a 2A3 just runs out of juice unless you have 99dB+ sensitive loudspeakers (or use a self-powered subwoofer in the mix). There are no major horn loudspeakers in the $2k-$4k range that i have reviewed that could be personally recommended. Someone probably makes a great one somewhere. In the end a glorious 300B and the Reference de Capo should be a match made in heaven. Always glad to be of service. Of course in the end what REALLY matters is that YOU...

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Mr. Rochlin,

I was reading the article reviewing the audio note speakers - paying particular attention to the Snell connection. Apparently the late Peter Snell designs (e.g. the E2) were preferred over the first hybrid Peter Snell/Kevin Voecks designs (e.g. the E3). Personally, I own a pair of the E3s - and haven't really found a speaker in the sub $2,000 to $2,500 range that motivates me (and I've looked since I can't seem to shake my "upgrade" cravings). I seem to have just about changed everything else... I've listened to "appropriate" B&W, PSB, Paradigm, Totem and Magnepan - love 'em but there is just no way my wife, baby girl, and cat would even allow those beasts to survive in my house.

My question is this: I'd bet Audio note upgraded the "E2"with top of the line components wherever possible, which I'm sure contributes heavily to the final price tag ($$$$), however, the E2s and E3s by Snell went for around $1,000, or a little less even, and will run $250 to $400 used depending on condition: anyone put the Audio Note "E" up against either Snell version (E2 or E3)? I'd be curious...

Regards,

Jordan Dourmashkin

Jordan,

Very good question. Have never seen anyone make the comparison between the old Snell and the new Audio Note offerings. As you well pointed out, Audio Note employs top-end parts and have refined the design. Naturally this adds to the current retail pricing. As for the price of the old Snells, costs and inflation cause prices to rise. Did you know in the 1970's you could buy a new Ferrari sports car for about $10,000. Today the new models begin at over $150,000. Just some food for thought.

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Dear Wayne,

I just read your review of the Von Schweikert VR-1 speakers. I am planning on purchasing these speakers and was wondering if you can suggest a few high quality integrated amplifiers in the $500 to $1,000 range that would be a great match with the VR-1's. My digital source will be the Rotel RCD-02 CD player.

I really like the looks of the new Cambridge Audio Azur 640A integrated amplifier and the Rotel RA-1062.

Thank You!

Mike

Hello Mike, 

I have not personally auditioned the two amplifiers you mention, but both are from good companies, and I'm sure would serve very well. I have also had good experiences with British integrated amplifiers from Rega and Arcam. For another approach, you might be interested in the tubed Jolida amplifiers--the VR-1s have a very tube-friendly impedance curve. Fortunately, your price range has quite a few high-value possibilities. 

Best wishes, 

Wayne 


 

02/01/04

Hi Karl, 

Can you help me find a copy of "The RCA Bible"? I have been searching the internet and can't find anything listed. I know the book is long out of print but would like to get a copy. I have many RCA stereo LP's and would be very interested in locating this book. Please let me know.

Thanks,

Bill Guarneri
billandianne@nycap.rr.com

Hi Bill,

No idea, always seemed to be rare and I believe only available through Jonathan's little private (I believe) publishing company, The Music Lovers Press, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Why not go about it the other way around and advertise on the internet, or possibly the Cincinnati newspaper what you want which may stimulate somebody to think about selling their copy. Perhaps a music reviewer at the Cincinnati newspaper might know of someone. Did you know that Jonathan Valin wrote a mystery novel that I found interesting entitled The Music Lovers and other audiophiles and music lovers seem to get a real kick out of it. Good Luck! let me know if you eventually find it.

Karl Lozier

NOTE: it can be purchased from www.irvmusic.com.


 

02/01/04

Steven,

Hello, my name is Bill Christiansen and I am writing to ask a question regarding your DIY pure silver interconnects. You recommend 18-22 gauge silver wire, and I want to know if you think 26 gauge would cause any problems in this application (I plan on making a simple twisted pair). I have recently read that smaller gauge wire may have sonic benefits over larger gauge wire. Thanks for all of the great information you put on the web, I find it extremely helpful.

Sincerely,

Bill Christiansen

Bill,

Thanks for your e-mail, 26 gauge should be fine for normal runs of a meter or two :)

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Steven,

I saw your review on the Reference 3A MM De Capo-i speakers. You are obviously very impressed. I am looking for speakers in this price range and was wondering how you feel the Thiel 2.4's stack up against these? Both speakers have rave reviews? Money-no-object, which would you recommend?

Thanks,

S. Rubin

S Rubin,

Alas, have never reviewed the Thiel and therefore can not comment. i can say the simplicity and high sensitivity with virtually no crossover of the Reference 3a means they have been very properly designed and will be easy to drive by virtually any amplifier. While looking at a photo of the Thiels, i see they have the drivers quite far apart. Interesting.. and the Thiel's low 87dB/W/m at 4 ohms (meaning they are approximately 84dB/W/m at 8 ohms). If you get the Thiels, make sure you have a
really strong (high current) amplifier.

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Hello Chris,

I read your review regarding the Outlaw 950 preamp (along with as many as I could find) and decided to give the unit a try. I have to admit that the sound is quite good and overall I like it. The problem I am having is with pops (or thumps) when I switch input devices, bring up the calibrate screen or switch surround sound modes. Outlaw did send me another unit, but it also pops.

Anyway, my question is "Does the 950 you have exhibit this behavior"?

Thanks for your time,

Jim

Hello Jim,

I have not noticed the behavior you mention in my system and I switch inputs and surround modes multiple times per listening session. Are you using the unit with an Outlaw amp or some other brand? I have used the Outlaw preamp with Outlaw, Tandberg and Marantz amps. I haven't tried the Outlaw with my Conrad-Johnson amp yet, but may do so soon.

It's possible that the amp is exacerbating the problem however, if the Outlaw is putting out a small voltage spike which the amp is unable to handle gracefully. If possible, try a separate amp (even an old receiver you have lying around) and see if the problem persists. 

Let me know what you find out as I'm curious.

Regards,

-Chris 


 

02/01/04

Mr. Olsher,

Your Blue Velvet line pre-amplifier looks very interesting and I'd like to build it. Is there any way to simplify the power supply, and also could you show me how to add a balance switch and phono stage on this pre-amplifier?

Thanks

JJ

Hi JJ,

Thank you for the feedback. In response to your questions:

1. One of the main reasons that the Blue velvet sounds as good as it does IS the power supply. Simplify the PS and sound quality is bound to suffer. BTW, the PS is neither that complex nor expensive to implement.

2. The best way to achieve the effect of a balance control is to install a separate mono volume control for each channel. You can than trim the L-R balance by using the individual volume controls. That's the cleanest way to do this.

3. There are no plans at the moment to scale up the design to include a phono stage. Perhaps next year.

Best regards... and as always, enjoy the music,

Dick Olsher


 

02/01/04

Dear Sir,

I read with interest your review of the Ah! Super Tjoeb CD player. It was most informative. I would like to know if you have heard the Jolida JD-100 tube CD player which uses it's tubes not as a buffer stage, but a true output. Theses are the two players that compete for the $1,000.00 money out here in the real world. What say you?? A comparison of the two would be of great value.

With Regards,

Jerry AKA: hifinutt

Hi Jerry,

Thank you for the feedback. Your suggestion definitely has merit. No promises, but let me see what I can do.

Enjoy the Music,

Dick Olsher


 

02/01/04

On behalf of Cain & Cain Co. I'd like to thank Ian White and Steve Rochlin for awarding the C&C Abby loudspeaker a Best of 2003 Budget Beater Award. We are very grateful for the recognition and will work to maintain value leadership.

Thanks Steve, Ian.

Terry Cain
The Cain & Cain Co.


 

02/01/04

Hi,

In many reviews I see terms such as the following:

laid back
cool
warm 
up front

Also many others. This can be components, speakers, etc. Would love to know what these and others actually describe.

Thank You

Hi,

Thanks for your e-mail. The best suggestion would be to purchase the excellent book by Robert Harley as reviewed here. Always glad to be of service.

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Dear Mr. Flood,

I thoroughly enjoyed your review of these speakers on the Enjoy the Music.com™ site. I am planning to purchase these speakers (solely for music - not home theatre), but am wondering how they might compare to Totem Staff speakers. Totem is also a Canadian company. Lastly, I plan to use these speakers with an NAD Integrated AMP (either model 350 or 370) and the NAD C542 CD player. Can you let me know if this makes sense. In particular, will I be compromising much if I choose the less expensive NAD C350 for the AMP. If you could help out it would be greatly appreciated and thanks again for your very thorough review.

Shabsie Adler

Shabsie,

With so many audio orchards around the globe, it is no wonder that I receive so many “how does one apple taste versus another” type questions. I have sampled relatively few of them, but I do try to give comparisons and links to the others, so you can click through them and see how one favor compares to another. Although a great value, I thought the M80s were more suitable for HT applications, then hyper-critical musical work. Tweaking audiophiles often demand more subtle nuisances from their fruit. With the US dollar buying 30% more in Canada, buying Canadian can possibly save money (if prices and shipping does not eat up the difference).

NAD equipment is known for its elegantly simple looks and better value, compared to more typical off the shelf fare. Stereophile’s Chip Stern said the flagship C370 was “an exceptionally solid, versatile, musical performer.” I said the M80s “do sound better with solid-state power. This energy requirement is implied by the lower than average 4-ohm impedance.” I do not know the price differential between the C350 and the C370, but at twice the power, along with a glowing review to help resell it, I think the more powerful unit will do the better job. Yours in listening, 

Colin


 

02/01/04

Hi Colin,

I'd like to add some comments regarding Axiom Millennia M80Ti. I have had these speakers for 4 years. I wasn't satisfied with the Sub-bass, it was poor and too boomy in some frequencies (boxness). I did not understand why for this price I had such a bad bass. So, I've decided to take a look what was inside. I took bass drivers out and was shocked by what I saw: 1). Bad quality of crossovers with sticked pieces of a newspaper and glue drops on it. 2). Dumping material was only a piece polyfill in the bottom of the box (in each box the size was very different). 3). The quality of the boxes from inside was very bad. I've decided to dump it myself (of course I took away pieces of a newspaper too;-)). So, I took fiberglass pieces with thickness of 1 inch and placed along the walls everywhere except the f! ront walls (I mean the walls of the speakers :-)). By this I have improved (fixed) the bass. The result was unbelievable: bass became warm, alive and much more defined. The fiberglass was very cheap $4 for everything... So, I don't understand why people writing such good reviews for unfinished work maybe it is only a business... What do you think about it?

Regards,

Alexander 


Alexander,

Wow! Thanks for the valuable information Alexander, 

So what do I think about it? As loudspeakers ascend in price, improving the depth and flatness of the low frequency response is one of the areas that get a lot of attention. Higher prices usually mean better bass response. 

Unfortunately, the increasing share of dealer margins, shipping & insurance, sales help, administrative overhead, copyright applications, advertising, customer service, warranty work, design and research easily eclipses even wildly successful products. Loudspeakers too. Not much is left over for the mere materials in many product budgets. This is one of the many reasons why dozens and dozens of small, local speaker manufacturers still exist today. They can offer what even big integrated driver and speaker makers like JBL and Bose cannot: better value; more speaker for the money. 

This is another reason why some manufacturers like Klipsch support tweaks and adjustments to their models with formal and informal advice, such as public forums. Your information and labor adds significant value to the initial product, enduring iterations and success. 

My writing is part of my audio/visual hobby. It provides treats for the ears, ammo for the brain and scratch for the pocket. Yet, my small efforts in the grand audio scheme of things are miniscule at best. I write about the features of the products I review and try to identify why someone might purchase the product. The friends I show products like the Axiom M80Tis to help identify what they like about them. Could they be more? Certainly. Are they unfinished? Definitely not. Bottom line, I don’t think the M80Tis are the last word in audio nirvana, but they do provide most of what most people look for in a home theater set-up. That is what I tried to communicate in my November 2002 review. 

Obviously, your audio goals go beyond most people. You transcended mere "interest in stereo or high-fidelity sound reproduction," as Dictionary.com says, to become “someone who wants to make some or all of those improvements themselves,” as I said. Congratulations and welcome to the tweaking audiophile club. You are now required to conduct wholly unscientific experiments with your home movie and music reproduction system and report back to us any successful changes! Yours in listening, 

Colin 


 

02/01/04

Hello Steve,

I enjoyed your show review, thanks. I was curious if you heard the Gilmore Audio? Could you give your opinion? Also, does the Eminent Technology sound as good as it looks like it might?

Thanks for your time,

Calvin

Calvin,

Alas, i make it a point that show conditions are horrible and
not the place to judge how something sounds. After all, there is more than a single component plus we must remember the horrible room acoustics. Sorry, wish there was a better way, yet listening within your home/system is always your best bet.


Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Guys, 

I love your site, but your showgirls section, funny though it obviously is intended to be, is pathetic! Apart from being puerile and reinforcing the stereotype of audiophiles as geeks without a life, this probably does not do a lot for any women who might be interested in audio...

Dan

Dan,

Thanks for your e-mail. This is exactly why there was fairness with photos of myself within the Milan 2003 show report. and also the recent CES coverage. What is good for the goose is good for the gander. Of course in the end what really matters is that you...

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Hi Steve,

I have followed both your reviews and posts on AudioAsylum and I recently enjoyed your thoughts on the two Audio Note Speakers. I had heard the AN E / SEC and was mightily impressed by the sound from rather unassuming (and this is polite) speakers. It's one of the rare times where my ear is fooled into believing a cello is a cello and not a facsimile of one. There are more impressive speakers perhaps at specific things but not a whole lot that seem to just get on with the task and let you relax.

I own Audio Note speakers...their little and seem to be totally ignored AN K Spe. I have seen no review of this model by anyone (except me at AA). Just curious, but it seems to be a little ignored. I actually bought the AN K Spe over the Reference 3a MM De Capo a speaker I have been raving about and recommending to people for more than 2 years. I'm finally ready to buy the De Capo and the dealer pulls out the AN K and smiles and it blew me away (to use a rather overused tired phrase). I seriously think this AN K speaker has a wondrous effortlessness and a bass and dynamic attack that is well... similar to your review of the other speakers.

Anyway I liked your review and the not so afraid to tell it like it is stance at Enjoy the Music.com™. Now, review the AN K (and zeros) for all those poorer folks will ya...the house sound of AN on the cheap (well cheaper).

Richard

Richard,

Thanks for your e-mail. Best bet would be for me to put this in perspective by saying the Reference 3a are in my computer office and are excellent, but in my main reference rig... Audio Note loudspeakers :)

Forget what others say and allow your ears, heart, and soul be your guide.


Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Colin,

I recently read your review of the Axiom Audio MT3i speakers. Are you familiar with the Von Schweikert VR-1 speakers? I was wondering if they are really that much better sounding than the MT3i's. I realize the VR-1's are $995 per pair as opposed to 275 per pair.

Thanks.

Michael

Gee Michael, 

That’s a tough one, since I have NOT heard the well-regarded Von Schweikert VR-1s. At first blush, they certainly look like the charming Axiom M3tis (go to Archives, Equipment Reviews, Loudspeakers). The VRs go a little bit deeper (40 vs. 50Hz). That depth is huge in critical music listening. Yet the Axioms are twice as sensitive at 93 dB/w/m, which makes a big difference with my Bottlehead 2A3 Paramour monoblocks. 

Worth thrice the price? I doubt it. But then I am a skeptic of the first order. I did not love the “Simply Cherry Coincident's Ultra High Sensitivity Triumph Signature Loudspeakers” which measure more like the punchy little Axioms than the VRs. Of course, music is in the ear of the beholder. It depends a lot on your tastes, room acoustics and front-end equipment. I would stretch the credit cards for a month and order both! Yours in listening, 

Colin


 

02/01/04

Steve,

I've read your comparison between the new AN-E/Lexus and old AN-J/SPx. I've done a similar comparison between the new AN-E/SP, AN-E/SE/SPx and my old AN-E/L. I agree with your conclusions. The midrange of the old AN-E/L sound more truthful then the newer versions. The old one sounds more natural then the new versions. So this seems not a difference in wiring. Because I use copper in the old AN's and not silver like you. Nor does it seem a difference in use of components between the better components in de SE version compared to the E versions. In my opinion it's the cabinet. Maybe the older sounds better/different even though the new cabinets have closer tolerances and better finish. Of course they must sound different because of difference in materials. From my experience in building AN-E cabinets I can say that a totally multiplex cabinet sounds tonally different then a MDF/Chipboard cabinet. I prefer MDF/Chipboard or MDF/Multiplex.

Martijn

Martijn,

Thanks for your e-mail. Seems we agree :)

Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

Hi,

I am a big fan of your magazine, I find it neutral and unbiased. Also I love to see your coverage of those smaller new audio companies. Thank you very much. In last VSAC show, the Cain & Cain speaker company was using the computer based digital source from VRS audio. The result is amazing, it broke the "rule" that no computer can sound good. And this brought up my interests. There are many professional soundcards on the market at a reasonable price (that is when comparing to "Hi-Fi" stuff.) Soundcards from Lynx (LynxTwo B), RME ( RME Digi96/8 PAD, 9624), M-Audio all seem promising. It would be very interesting to compare these soundcards to some Hi-End gear, CD-players and external DACs. Would you be interested in setting up such test and let us know more about the new computer digital technology? It will be fun to see the results. And again, thank you for doing such a great job. I enjoy all the reviews very much every month.

Sincerely,

Jack Ker

Jack,

Thanks for the suggestion. I have written several articles on this which can be found in the archives. Indeed, I find that a Home Theater Computer with the proper hard and software can sound as least as good if not better than the best CD reproducers out there. In addition, the computer can store all of your digital software in one area where it can be accessed with ease, act as as pre-pro, can do digital manipulation of the data for room and speaker correction, multi channel from two channel reproduction, up and downsampling to 24/192, equalization, and ambience improvement. Finally, it can do by far, the best DVD video and audio playback, HDTV, Dolby Digital, Dolby Pro Logic II, SRS and DTS decoding, plus all of the other things a normal computer can do, all for considerably less than the cost of a mid high end CD playback system.

The major drawback at present is the lack of coordinating software that makes the process easy for the average person. Actually, this is not a problem for most high enders who's systems are complicated to begin with, as one can use this one machine to replace a CD player, D/A and A/D converter, preamp or pre-pro, equalizer, multiple interconnects, video switcher, DVD player, and very soon, a DVD-A player. I guess I'll have to write a new article on the subject as there are several companies who have gotten on this bandwagon with some very interesting product.

Bill


 

02/01/04

Rick,

Thank you very much for your review of the Manley NeoClassic 250's. I do not have the ability to audition the amps here in the greater Houston, TX area, but based partly on your review, purchased a pair from a dealer out of state. 

They are a tremendous product and I can now see why you liked them as well. I played the Mark Knopfler/James Taylor cut "Sailing to Philadelphia" and was impressed with the warmth and "non-hi fi" sound in triode mode. For me, no need to even go to Tetrode. 

Thanks again and Happy Listening. 

Gerry Nemeth

Gerry,

Thanks so much for the kind note. I am glad that you agreed -- the Manleys are a not inconsequential purchase and it is great to know that you feel your time and expense were not wasted. As formidable as they are, you just kind of forget about them because it is the music that shines.

Best regards,

Rick


 

02/01/04

Good day Karl,

I happened to read your recent article entitled "Moderately Priced Vibration Isolation Device Shootout". I really appreciated your review. However, I am a bit confused with the fact that you used an old record cabinet as your equipment stand for your shootout. And perhaps that may explain why some of the products you evaluated offered little or no sonic benefits.

As you are probably aware, there are essentially three methodologies toward the handling of air-borne vibration and resonance:

1) Decoupling aka isolation and dampening. 
2) Coupling aka mechanical transfer of air-borne vibrations to ground.
3) The ecumenical methodology which essentially includes those enthusiasts and vendors who attempt to combine the decoupling and coupling methodologies even though those methodologies are pretty much diametrically opposed.

I suppose that I am just a bit surprised that your shootout did not at least include one racking system from each of the methodologies stated above. In my opinion, only then could your shootout be considered even somewhat conclusive. 

Thank you for the nice article and for letting me voice my opinion.

John Stehno

John,

Thanks for your reply. The "record cabinet" is one of three well built so called "commodes", that I use for record storage as they look great even after modifications for audio use years ago; they do not like to vibrate. No metal framed techno looking stuff in my home. Please read all of bright Star's on line info. Coupling to ground is tough though seemingly simple. Anybody who thinks going through my carpet with so-called spikes "into-ha"! the underlying concrete is kidding themselves. All the products except one made an improvement. These were easy to use, at least moderately successful and at a bargain price - the reason behind the article. They are probably the cheapest products that have made an improvement, not just a change, that I've run across in a long time. I am going to check out a couple of very promising new products in this field at CES this week. Editor Steve Rochlin has checked out and reported on some more advanced products in this field. Sincerely,

Karl Lozier


 

02/01/04

Wayne,

What pre-amp(s) did you use with the JC1s during your experience with them? I have been looking at purchasing them, and am debating what preamp would have good synergy with the JC1s.

Thanks,

Marc Olender

Hello Marc, 

The majority of my listening to the JC 1s was with the tubed, single-ended Thor TA-1000 line stage and Thor TA-3000 phono stage, although for briefer periods I substituted two other preamplifiers scheduled for upcoming reviews: the tubed, balanced Atma-Sphere MP-3 and the solid-state Specron, which offers both RCA and XLR main outputs. Both are @ $4,000, both include excellent phono stages, and both worked beautifully with the JC 1s. 

This of course represents a very small sampling of all the available products. My advice is to audition any preamplifiers you are interested in with the amplifiers. The JC 1s are so neutral in tonality that the preamplifier will very likely have more to do with the overall sound of your system than the amplifiers. 

Best wishes,

Wayne Donnelly 


 

02/01/04

Dear Mr.Gold,

Let me start by extending my best wishes for the New Year and allow me the opportunity to reflect upon your thoughtful review of the JMLabs Grand Utopia Be speaker of last August, specifically its Be tweeter.

I may consider the purchase of a (Grand) Utopia Be or its equivalent of another brand but my problem is that these flagship products are - usually - nowhere on display, so reviews like yours are valuable to form at least some first impressions.

Therefore kindly allow me one question of a general nature: I am not a technician, but is it correct to assume that the weight of the cone of a tweeter is only a minor part of the whole of the moving parts and that the power of the magnets and the weight of the wiring are probably more relevant in allowing a good acceleration of the whole tweeter unit? Inverted diamond and/or beryllium tweeters may result in lighter cones, but I wonder why e.g. Dynaudio sticks to soft dome tweeters. 

Having heard the Sonus Faber Amati Homage and the Dynaudio Temptation, although occasionally and rather briefly, I must say that their HF performance compares favorably to the competition when it comes to more or less faithful reproduction of the live experience in the concert halls I frequent for classical concerts.

A penny for your thoughts,

Ronald Dunki

Dear Ronald Dunki,

I am not in a position to give a definitive picture of how a drive unit works, but the general position is a mater of simple physics, though the details are undeniably complex. Acceleration is limited by the ratio of power (ie motor EMF) to weight (moving mass of all the suspended parts). But there are other limiting factors related for example to the elasticity and other non-linearities of the cone and its surround, and also of the main structure of the tweeter and its mounting. The dynamics of drive unit behavior are also frequency related, and as you correctly suggest voice coil wiring plays a significant role. One of the strengths of the Focal.JMlab design is that the inverted dome allows the use of a smaller diameter (and therefore lighter) voice coil and former while providing intrinsically superior mechanical control over the dome. In the case of the Utopia Be series tweeter, the low weight of the dome is clearly a factor, but probably secondary to the excellent self-damping that beryllium provides. 

There are many reasons for using soft domes, including obvious ones like relatively low cost. Another is that with appropriate design, the dome can be made to gently decouple at specific frequencies and mitigate the effects of the high-Q resonances that makes so many hard dome tweeters so unpalatable. I know from personal experience that Sonus Faber use some particularly fine soft dome tweeters - I have less experience of Dynaudio, but believe them to be of a high standard too. Based on what I have heard though the Focal beryllium unit is perhaps the finest series production dome tweeter currently available, though even the best tweeter is only be one element in a complete, rounded loudspeaker. 

Hope this helps

Alvin Gold


 

02/01/04

Bill,

I am trying to decide whether or not to purchase the cs-3xjr. After reading about it in one article it mentioned that it was ALMOST as good as a ac3 decoder. That made me stop and think, because I have a spare ac3 decoder in the closet and instead of buying something that's almost as good why don't I use it. So here I am asking the question to you, can I use my ac3 decoder and plug in the left and right surround channels from my ac5 decoder via an amp, and get the same outcome? I'm so close to buying the product, but if I can use what I have then I will... your advice is greatly appreciated.

Al

Al, 

The CS-3 cx and it smaller brother work in the analog domain, taking a two channel analog signal with ambience information and matrixes it to 7.1, including two side, two rear and one overhead channels. The AC-3 decoder takes a digital signal that is multi-channel encoded and decodes it to 5.1, 6.1 or 7.1 depending on the decoder. So they are not the same thing. If you listen primarily to digital you should go with the AC-3 decode, if in two channel analog then go with the CS-3. If you have a digital 5.1 channel AC-3 decoder, you can piggyback the CS-3 on the analog two side channel output of the AC-3 to derive the 7.1 rear channel information or on the front and rear center channels of a 6.1 decoder to derive the overhead channel.

Bill


 

02/01/04

Dear Steve,

How...I can clean my 6DJ8/6922/7308 tubes pins from my lovely Audio Research SP-9 Mk-2, in the best and simple way...as I have a lot of them and mostly are dirty & corroded?

Thanks in advance for your noble effort!

Sincerely,

Alex

Alex,

i'd suggest using CAIG as reviewed by clicking here. Once the pins are clean, make sure you do not leave it on (per se). A little of it goes a
long way once the pins are cleaned.


Enjoy the Music,

Steven R. Rochlin


 

02/01/04

I really enjoyed reading Ian White's Fi amplifier review -- or "Nottingham Hill" as I call it. It gives hope to all of us that beautiful movies stars might in fact have great appreciation for our music systems and invite us for coffee or a concert.

James Duncan

 


 

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